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A judge prevents Louisiana’s “trigger law” restricting abortion from going into effect.

On Monday, a court in Louisiana temporarily invalidated three state laws that would have outlawed almost all abortions.
If the Supreme Court ever overruled Roe v. Wade, as it did on Friday, the abortion restrictions were supposed to go into force. Similar legislation, referred to as “trigger laws,” have been passed by several states across the US.

Shortly after an abortion clinic in the state filed a lawsuit, Orleans Parish Civil District Court Judge Robin Giarrusso ordered the temporary halt, according to the ruling.

The Center for Reproductive Rights, which represents abortion organisations, claims that the restrictions on abortion are unconstitutional and violate the due process rights of the providers.

The groups contend that the statutes are too ambiguous since they do not specify a start date after Roe. On July 8, Giarrusso has scheduled a hearing for the lawsuit. The decision to extend the stay will then be made by the court. For the time being, abortions are still permitted in the state.

ABORTIONS TO BE RESTRICTED IN MORE THAN DOZEN STATES FOLLOWING ROE V. WADE REVERSAL

For the first time since Roe v. Wade was decided upon in 1973, state governments are now able to control abortion. This decision was made by the Supreme Court on Friday.

The trigger laws in Louisiana would forbid abortions in all circumstances save when the mother is in danger of death or serious damage. There are no exceptions to the statutes for rape or incest.

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